PERUVIAN FOOD: 47 BEST PERUVIAN DISHES AND TRADITIONAL FOOD IN PERU TO TRY

Last updated on October 17th, 2021 at 03:43 am

We will write about Peruvian food with the best 47 Peruvian dishes. The Peruvian cuisine is world famous for sure, the food in Peru is good! There are also some dishes that are authentic traditional food in Peru to try and drinks in Peru.

Peruvian food is a combination of indigenous and foreign flavors. While rooted in indigenous traditions, Peruvian cuisine, has absorbed influences from numerous civilizations over the centuries, including European, African, and Asian. Peruvian food is often prepared spicy with ají pepper, as a primary ingredient.

A total of $5-6 USD dollar can be your daily food budget travel in Peru. Local food in a local restaurant will start from $3-5 USD. And you can get snack like street foods for $1 USD. You can buy a combination of ceviche and lomo salteado with a drink for only $3 USD.

Peru is among the most diverse countries on earth. It is a cosmopolitan country with rich traditions, a distinct gastronomy, and extensive natural resources. Peru is a region of contrasts, ranging from Machu Picchu and the Inca Trail to the Amazon jungle and a large, bustling metropolis.

You’re in for a treat if you’re wondering what to eat in Peru. We have compiled a list of best 47 Peruvian dish to try.

Read here Peru sim card for tourist and how to get from Lima airport to city center.

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PERUVIAN FOOD: 47 BEST PERUVIAN DISHES AND TRADITIONAL FOOD IN PERU TO TRY

PERUVIAN DISHES: TRADITIONAL FOOD IN PERU

1. CEVICHE

Peruvian Food, Peruvian cuisine, Traditional Peruvian Food, food in Peru, Peruvian dishes, Ceviche

Peruvian ceviche is a traditional dish. It was invented by fishermen as a means to consume a portion of their catch during hard days at sea. The acid in lime juice is used to cook the fish. Ceviche is made up of raw fish or shellfish cuts that have been seasoned with salt, onion, and hot peppers before being soaked in lemon zest.

The smoothness of the fish changes, as does its color, from pink to white, due to the acidity of lemon zest. When the Spanish brought lemons and onions to the country, the Indians marinated fish and amarillo chilies in the juices of a native fruit called tumbo, which was later replaced by lemon juice. Ceviche is ideally served at room temperature or chilled!

2. LOMO SALTADO (STIR-FRY BEEF)

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Peruvian Food – Image from Wikimedia

Lomo saltado is the most famous foods in Peru. Stir-fried marinated pieces of sirloin or beef tenderloin, onions, yellow peruvian peppers, and tomatoes create lomo saltado. Mostly all Peruvian restaurants, whether modest or sophisticated, offer the meal over French fries and rice on the side.

Due to the rise of Chinese immigrants during the nineteenth century, the meal has a strong Asian flavour. Throughout years, several Chinese cooking skills were blended with Peruvian cooking styles, and new foods, such as lomo saltado, were created.

3. AJI DE GALLINA

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Peruvian Dishes – Image from Wikimedia

Aji de gallina is a spicy chicken meal with a cheese sauce and chicken broth. It’s usually commonly served with olives, as well as baked potatoes. Aji amarillo chilis, garlic, onions, nuts, cheese, and crust less bread are used to make the sauce, which is commonly spiced with cumin, pepper, oregano, turmeric, and parsley. Aji de gallina exemplifies the importance of simplicity. Also, this dish will tickle your taste buds!

4. PAPA A LA HUANCANA

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Image from Wikimedia

Papa a la Huancana is indeed a Peruvian starter that originated in Huancayo, Peru, in the late 1800s. A hot, milky, and delicious cheese sauce is poured on boiling white or yellow potatoes to the meal. Papa a la Huancana is a unique and unusual salad meal. The meal is topped with parsley, black olives, and chopped hard-boiled eggs, while the sauce is made out of aji amarillo chili peppers, oil, milk, cheese, salt, and thickening crackers.

5. CUY

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Image form Serious Eats

Cuy is a dish related to traditional Peruvian food, yet it is enjoyed in other South American nations also including Ecuador, Colombia, and Bolivia. Westerners are terrified of this dish, which they regard as more of a pet than a meal. Consider the allure of delicate, smokey black meat beneath a shimmering golden veneer of shatteringly crisp skin.

Consider it a suckling pig with only one serving. Cuy is primarily consumed on special events, following an indigenous tradition dating back to ancient times to the Incan empire.

6. CAUSA RELLENA

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Causa rellena is derived out from Incan Quechua word kausaq, meaning provider of life and is another name for the potato. It is thought that the meal was created during the Pacific War. Yellow potatoes instead and tuna salad or chicken are used to make this typical Peruvian meal.

The potatoes are usually shaped or chopped into circles, with the contents sandwiched within them. Mayonnaise, aj amarillo peppers, and lemon juice are used to spice the meal. Causa rellena is generally served chilled on a bowl of lettuce with black olives on over, making it an excellent appetizer or light dinner on its own.

7. ROCOTO RELLENO (STUFFED SPICY PEPPERS)

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Rocoto relleno is a Peruvian version of stuffed peppers that is famous in Arequipa, a city in the Andes highlands in southern Peru that is known for its adaptations of Spanish foods. The meal is hot, oven-baked rocoto jalapeno pepper stuffed over mince beef, pork, onion, and chunks of hard-boiled eggs. 

Cumin, chile paste, salt, and ground pepper are commonly used to season the filling. Rocoto relleno is widely recommended with a melted strip of mozzarella cheese atop the filling. This savory starter is frequently served with baked potatoes or a variety of salads on the side.

8. ANTICUCHOS DE CORAZON

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Anticucho de Corazon is a popular and Peruvian dish. Beef heart skewers are used in this recipe, which are produced with beef heart, oil, red wine vinegar, garlic, oregano, cumin, salt, and aji panca hot pepper paste. The beef heart is chopped into pieces and stewed with the rest of the ingredients.

Anticucho de Corazon, the pieces are skewered and barbecued till cooked properly and blackened. Common side dishes for these beef heart skewers includes thick sliced boiled potatoes, corn, and aji amarillo sauce on the side for dipping.

9. ARROZ CON PATO

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Traditional Food In Peru – Image from Wikimedia

Arroz con Pato was among the most popular foods in Peru, and it differs from other rice dishes in terms of flavoring. Ducks meat, oils, onions, garlic, rice, beans, squash, peppers, scallion, aji limo peppers, lemon zest, and salt are commonly used. In cooking arroz con pato, after browning the duck meat and adding the water, the garlic, onions, and squash are cooked in oil.

When the duck is cooked, remove it from the pan and simmer the rice, peas, pepper, and coriander in the cooking water. All this contributes to the duck’s distinct flavor, which, when combined well with rice, creates a memorable and delectable taste.

10. POLLO A LA BRASA

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The Pollo a la brasa has been created at Lima in the 1950s, when it was just flavored with salt, however, nowadays, the chicken is frequently marinated in a particular combination of spices, which typically includes vinegar, salt, peppers, herbs, chilli, and dark beer.

Pollo a la brasa is a famous Peruvian meal that consists of crunchy, juicy charcoal-grilled chicken offered with a side of Fries and vegetables. This meal is delicious, nutritious, and readily available!

11. JALEA

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Image from Wikimedia

Jalea is indeed a seafood meal that consists of thinly coated and deep-fried fish, usually tuna, halibut, cod, or striped bass, as well as various mixed seafood such as squid, octopus, prawns, and scallops. It’s commonly served over chifles, which are thinly sliced and fried plantains, and a deliciously tart salad of lime-marinated red onions, tomato, and cilantro.

Jalea is commonly served with salsa criolla, aj amarillo, and rocoto sauces, as well as yucca chips or toasted Andean chulpe maize nuts known as canchas for added crunch.

12. ALPACA MEAT

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Peruvian Food – Image from Wikimedia

Alpaca meat is a non-greasy meat with a buffalo-like unique flavor. The softness and flavor of various sections of an alpaca vary, but in general, a decent alpaca meat is better than some of the best steaks ever cooked. Anticuchos, which include of tasty bits of grilled alpaca flesh, potatoes or onion, and a squeeze of lime, are also made with alpaca meat.

13. ARROZ CHAUFA

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Peruvian Food – Image from Taste Atlas

Arroz chaufa is a famous Peruvian meal that has a strong Chinese influence. It’s made up of fried rice, meats, veggies, and fruits, among other ingredients. It contains a mixture of fried rice with veggies, typically containing scallions, eggs, and chicken, swiftly cooked at a high flame, often in a wok with soy sauce and oil. Arroz chaufa is generally served with sliced onions and parsley.

14. CARAPULCRA

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Image from Wikimedia

Carapulcra is a Peruvian soup cooked includes dry potatoes, pork, peanut sauce, pimento peppers, and a variety of fresh herbs, including rocket and mint. Onions, garlic, black pepper, and ground cumin are frequently used to season the stew. Carapulcra should be served with rice and duck just on side.

15. TRUCHA FRITA

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Trucha Frita is a pretty standard food in Peru. The meal is Peruvian fried trout and it isn’t a culinary masterpiece, but it is genuine Andean cuisine without seafood. Fresh trout, potatoes, lettuce, white flour, and butter are all used to make trucha frita.

16. SHAMBAR

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Peruvian Food – Image from Wikimedia

Shambar is a classic Peruvian stew that comes out from Trujillo region. It’s cooked using smoky pork, ham, hog skin, pork ears, beef, and poultry, as well as a variety of beans, wheat, chickpeas, and peas. Shambar is frequently eaten only on Mondays to help workers get ready for the week ahead.

17. HIGADO ENCEBOLLADO

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Higado encebollado is a classic South American meal that is notably famous in Mexico and Peru. Beef liver and onions are the main components in this dish. Higado encebollado is frequently commonly served or mashed potatoes as a side dish.

18. TACU-TACU

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Peruvian Cuisine – Image from Wikimedia

Tacu-tacu is a classic Peruvian meal made with rice, beans, various spices, and onions. In most cases, the components are pan-fried and molded into a thick, pancake-like meal. Tacu-tacu is usually topped with a fried egg and accompanied by breaded and fried meat, fried plantains, and criolla salsa.

19. ADOBO

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Adobo is a tasty, vibrant meal with a strong red or brown tinge. This soup meal is famous in Arequipa, and it’s served with rice or bread dipped in the liquid. The marination process, which infuses the meat in this pig stew with loads of flavor, is the key to adobo.

20. ARROZ CON CAMARONES

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Peruvian Food – Image from Wikimedia

Arroz con camarones is a famous meal across Latin America, particularly in Peru and Mexico. Rice cooked in a fragrant shrimp broth is paired with prawns, peppers, tomatoes, and onions in this meal. Arroz con camarones is typically flavored with cumin, garlic, and achiote, and garnished with chopped fresh parsley.

21. CHUPE DE CAMARONES

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Image from Wikimedia

Chupe de camarones, also known as chuwa misa, was first produced in the 16th century. The meal is a famous Peruvian shrimp chowder with a unique history. Chupe de camarones is normally cooked with fish stock, shrimps, onions, eggs, milk, cheese, garlic, and potatoes, while rice, beans, carrots, and peas are included sometimes.

22. SECO DE CARNA

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Image from wikimedia

Seco de Carne is a classic Peruvian soup that dates back to the colonial period, when it was known as Seco Tajime and was made with mutton. The major ingredient in seco de carne is eryngium foetidum, a species of cilantro related to coriander that, in addition to possessing therapeutic characteristics, has a distinct flavor. Despite its basic appearance, seco de carne is a fragrant, mouthfeel soup.

23. CHOCLO CON QUESO

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Choclo con queso is a Peruvian food that can be eaten as a snack, starter, or side dish. The flavor is similar to regular sweet corn. Choclo with queso is typically purchased from street vendors.

24. TIRADITO

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Image from Wikimedia

Tiradito is a classic Peruvian meal made out of thinly sliced, well-chilled raw fish, chopped vegetables, and coriander sprinkled with lemon or lime juices just before serving to keep the fish raw. Typically, tiradito is served as an entrée!

25. PACHAMANCA

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Image from Wikimedia

Pachamanca refers to the procedure of preparing the earth pot. The meal is an old Peruvian cuisine prepared in a hole in the ground with marinated pieces of meat, herbs, chili, beans, and potatoes. In making a natural pot in the ground, the materials for pachamanca are set on hot stones and covered with leaves.

26. TEQUEÑOS

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Image from Wikimedia

Tequeños is a snack that is thought to have originated in the city of Los Teques. The meal is a popular Venezuelan snack made up of fried wonton wrappers or cheese-filled empanada dough. Tequeños are typically eaten with guacamole or salsa de palta, among other sauces and dips.

27. PEPPERAZZI PEPPERS

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The Pepperazzi Peppers are small, strong red peppers from Peru that have a fiery, acidic flavor that is complimented by a sweet vinegar sauce. This peppers can be stuffed in creamy cheeses, Italian sausage, or crabmeat, or used in salads, pizzas, spaghetti, and other dishes.

MORE PERUVIAN FOOD: PERUVIAN CUISINE DESSERTS TO TRY

28. PICARONES

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Image from Wikimedia

Picarones, commonly known as Peruvian doughnuts are a staple of Peruvian street food. They are delectable, deep-fried snacks. The dessert are made by shaping dough into circle and deep-frying it in hot oil. They are then coated with a sweet cane syrup. Picarones were popularized later by the nuns of Saint Claire’s convent, and they are still popular today, especially during religious festivals in October.

29. LUCUMA ICE CREAM

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Image from Wikimedia

Lucuma ice cream is a combination of rich sweet taste that blends our original tastes and conjures up images of Peru’s magnificent Andean scenery. With a hint of caramel or maple, the dessert is creamy and lemony. Others have likened lucuma ice cream to sweet potato, and it has a similar flavor.

30. MAZAMORRA MORADA AND ARROZ CON LECHE

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Image from Wikimedia

The famous delicacy Combinado, which consists of a mixture of two of Peru’s most traditional desserts is mazamorra morada and arroz con leche. The combination of these desserts is known as Clásico, after the famed soccer derby between the country’s two most prominent teams the Universitario de Deportes and Alianza Lima.

31. ALFAJORES

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Alfajores possibly originated in the Middle East and entered southern Spain as far ago as the eighth century when the Moors inhabited the Iberian Peninsula. This cookie is extremely soft and tasty! Alfajores are sandwich cookies loaded with dulce de leche, a milk-and-sugar-based caramel dessert.

32. QUESO HELADO

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Image from Wikimedia

Queso helado, the name of this delectable Peruvian dessert literally translates to “frozen cheese.” Easy to create, queso helado is a delicious way to end any dinner. Visualize a sugary, ice-cold portion of milk, coconut, cinnamon, and vanilla gently melting below a dusting of syrup or fruit.

33. SUSPIRO A LA LIMENA

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Image from Wikimedia

Suspiro de Limea is a classic Peruvian dessert which originates in Lima. A layer of dulce de leche is topped with a meringue flavored with Port and a sprinkling of cinnamon. Eggs, evaporated milk, and port syrup are the main ingredients in suspiro de limea.

34. PARFAIT

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Parfait is a frozen dessert created using egg yolks, sugar, and whipped cream as a basis, and can be sweetened with a variety of other additions including such fruit, nuts, or coffee. Traditionally, parfait is served on beautiful plates, parfaits are now typically stacked in tall, thin flute glasses.

35. TURRON DE DOÑA PEPA

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Image from Wikimedia

Josefa Maraminillo, a woman from the Caete Valley, is thought to have invented Turrón de Doña Pepa. The dessert is a classic Peruvian delicacy that is cooked and served during October, or el mes morada, as it is known in Peru. The nougat of turrón de doña pepa is stacked and drizzled with chancaca before being topped with a rainbow of sprinkles and sweets.

36. FREJOL COLADO

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Image from Wikimedia

Frejol colado has been around for almost 400 years, and it is thought to have originated in Chincha and Caete. Black beans, sugar, milk, and spices make up frejol colado, a classic Afro-Peruvian delicacy. Skinned beans are crushed into a purée, then simmered with sugar, milk, and spices like cloves, sesame seeds, and anise seeds until the meal thickens.

37. CREMA VOLTEADA

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Crema Volteada is a dessert that originated in Spain. But it’s one of those classic Peruvian desserts that brings the best Peruvian refreshments to a close. This crema volteada is a sugar bomb, but every taste is worth it. The most important ingredients of the dessert are evaporated and condensed milk, sugar, and eggs.

PERUVIAN DRINKS: WHAT DRINKS IN PERU TO TRY

38. PISCO SOUR

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Outside of Peru, the most well-known Peruvian drink is the Pisco Sour, which is also the country’s national cocktail. Pisco Sour is a Peruvian cocktail made with Pisco, lemon, sugar syrup, and egg whites.

The additives are shaken with ice before being poured into an old-fashioned glass with Angostura bitters on top. If you’re visiting Peru, you’ve most likely heard about it and want to try it!

39. CHICHA MORADA

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Chicha morada is a Peruvian drink that originates in the Andean areas but is now widely drunk throughout the country. Corn culli, also known as purple maize, is the main ingredient in the drink. It is a Peruvian species of corn that is widely farmed and harvested all along Andes Mountains.

Chicha morada has a delicious, not-too-sweet flavor that reminds me of mulled wine and melting grape popsicles.

40. INCA KOLA

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Image from Wikimedia

Inca Kola is indeed the top brand of soft drinks in Perú. The drink does have a sweet, fruity taste that is similar to the main component, lemon verbena, and is tastier than Coca-Cola. The scent of Inca Kola is similar to that of cream soda and bubble gum.

41. CHICHA DE JORA

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Image from Wikimedia

Chicha de jora is a classic Peruvian alcoholic drink prepared using fermented jora, a yellowish maize variety. The existence of pottery mills at Machu Picchu indicates that the Incas manufactured chicha de jora, which was most probably consumed and utilized as a ritual drink. Chicha de jora is made from maize that has been germinated and the malt sugars extracted.

42. COCA TEA

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Image from Wikimedia

Coca tea is an herbal infusion prepared by soaking coca leaves or coca leaf teabags in boiling water. This ancient drink is used to medicate altitude sickness and is slightly energizing due to the small amounts of alkaloids. Coca tea is a mild stimulant that tastes alike to some other traditional teas and it’s not as strong as coffee.

43. EMOLIENTE

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Image from Wikimedia

Emoliente is made with a combination of herbs chosen by the person who makes it. The drink is popular among Peruvians because of its pleasant, relaxing taste and its medical benefits. Considering on which herbs are utilized in the blend, emoliente has a variety of flavors. Flax seeds, which are known to decrease cholesterol levels, are one of the most prevalent constituents in emoliente.

44. CUSQUEÑA

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Image from Wikimedia

Cusqueña is an ultra-premium lager from Cuzco, the Inca Empire’s capital. It’s been brewed since 1911 with only the best organic ingredients, such pure mountain water from a spring at 18,000 feet in Peru’s Andes. Cusqueña has a sweet, malty flavor that is similar to sugary barley coffee or ice coffee.

45. CHICANO

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For many Peruvians, a Chicano, rather than a Pisco Sour, is the preferred Peruvian drink. This is due to the sweetness of Pisco Sours, which does not sit well after a few. Pisco, ginger ale, lime, and angostura bitters make up a Chicano. It’s light and refreshing, and you only need a few to get the full effect!

46. PILSEN CALLAO

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Image from Wikimedia

Pilsen Callao is a 5% alcohol-by-volume Peruvian beer in the “Pale lager” style. The drink is brewed by Backus y Johnston, Peru’s Union De Cervecerias Peruanas. Pilsen Callao has a harsh, citrusy flavor with hints of hops, malts, toast, and grass.

47. PERUVIAN WINE

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Peruvian wine dates from the 16th century, when the region was colonized by the Spanish. Peru has a climate that is similar to that of Chile, which is ideal for wine production. In 2008, Peru had approximately 14,000 hectares of grape plantings, including table grapes, and generated approximately 610,000 hectoliters of wine, including both plantations as well as wine making on the rise.

WHERE TO STAY IN PERU

There are numerous hotels and B&B that you can choose from. Accommodation price can take you around $10 USD if you sleep in a dorm. For mid budget accommodation starts at $30-50 USD and more than $80 USD you will find luxury accommodation in Peru.

CLICK HERE TO BOOK YOUR ACCOMMODATION IN PERU BEFORE YOUR TRIP WITH BOOKING.

BEST TIME TO VISIT IN PERU

You can go to Peru any time of the year. The months of December to February are the best time to visit Peru because is the sunniest also the peak season. October to November are the months ideal for those working with a budget because its is considered the low season in the country.

Click here to know more about the weather in Peru.

Having insurance while you are traveling outside your home country is very important. Make sure that you have one too, to keep you safe in your trips around the world.

Hope you liked our Peruvian food blog post. Let us know if we missed any food in Peru and which one is your favorite one in the list of Peruvian dishes.

Feel free to use our links with discounts for BookingAgodaAirbnb and Klook. By using our links, you will help us to continue with the maintenance of the website and it will not cost you anything. Thanks for the love guys. 

Happy Travels!

Ruben Arribas is a Spanish traveler who has traveled more than 70+ countries around the world. Now based in the Philippines!

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